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Arts Culture Four Solo Art Shows To Check Out Over The Summer Holidays

Four Solo Art Shows To Check Out Over The Summer Holidays

Four Solo Art Shows To Check Out Over The Summer Holidays
By Relaxnews
July 30, 2019
From the sounds of the Met's collection to Australian Aboriginal art, here are four international exhibitions to visit before the end of August 2019.

1/4 "The EY Exhibition: Van Gogh and Britain" at Tate Britain, London

 

This show examines the Dutch artist through his little-known relationship with Britain, exploring how Van Gogh was inspired by British art, literature and culture throughout his career. It features over 45 works by the artist from public and private collections around the world, bringing together the largest group of Van Gogh paintings shown in the UK for nearly a decade. Among them are "At Eternity's Gate" and "Prisoners Exercising," both of which Van Gogh painted while he was a self-admitted patient at the Saint-Paul asylum in the south of France. The exhibition also highlights how British writers, and most particularly Charles Dickens, influenced Van Gogh's oeuvre. His 1890 portrait "L'Arlésienne" notably features a favorite book by Dickens in the foreground.

 

"The EY Exhibition: Van Gogh and Britain" is on view until August 11 at London's Tate Britain. For tickets and additional information, see the institution's website.

2/4 "Goobalathaldin Dick Roughsey: Stories of this Land" at the Queensland Art Gallery and Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA), Brisbane

ROUGHSEY, Dick GoobalathaldinAustralia b.1924 d.1985Tribe on the move in the past, Cape York1983Oilon board30 x 40cmAcc. 2015.092Gift of Simon, Maggie and Pearl Wright through the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art Foundation 2015. Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program
ROUGHSEY, Dick GoobalathaldinAustralia b.1924 d.1985Tribe on the move in the past, Cape York1983Oilon board30 x 40cmAcc. 2015.092Gift of Simon, Maggie and Pearl Wright through the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art Foundation 2015. Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program

This exhibition marks the first major retrospective in Australia celebrating the work of Goobalathaldin Dick Roughsey, who was a pioneer of Aboriginal art. It features more than 70 artworks, ranging from paintings to draft illustrations from his children's books, as well as ceremonial and historical objects. Roughsey is renowned for his award-winning children's book, "The Rainbow Serpent," which tells stories from Australian Aboriginal culture.

His artistic practice had its origins in traditional bark painting, in which he explored Lardil ancestral narratives in a distinctive figurative style. He later transitioned into modern paintings in oil and acrylic, depicting life on his native Mornington Island both before and after European contact.

 

"Goobalathaldin Dick Roughsey: Stories of this Land" is on show until August 18 at QAGOMA in Brisbane. Tickets and additional information are available on the museum's website.

3/4 "Tom Wood: Mothers, Daughters, Sisters" at the Rencontres d'Arles, Arles

This exhibition is part of the Rencontres d'Arles, the annual photography festival that runs from July 1 through September 22 in Arles, France. It focuses on the wide-ranging practice of British photographer Tom Wood, who photographed the everyday life of Liverpudlians for thirteen years. "Tom Wood: Mothers, Daughters, Sisters" brings together a corpus of prints selected from his eponymous series, shot on the streets of Liverpool and surrounding areas between the early 1970s and the late 1990s. It also features a selection of old postcards of mothers and daughters which Wood collected while he was still at school.

 

"Tom Wood: Mothers, Daughters, Sisters" is on show until August 25 at the Salle Henri-Comte in Arles, France. More information can be found on the website of the Arles photography festival.

4/4 "Oliver Beer: Vessel Orchestra" at the Met Breuer, New York City

 

"Oliver Beer: Vessel Orchestra" marks the first sound-based performance exhibition ever commissioned by the Met. The installation is composed of 32 hollow artworks from the museum's collection, including sculptures, utilitarian containers and decorative objects. British artist Oliver Beer selected the vessels for their innate sound frequencies, capturing the ambient tones resonating within each object via small microphones activated by a keyboard.

The arrangement of artworks forms a versatile musical instrument, similar to an organ with multiple pipes that is capable of producing the 32 sequential pitches of a keyboard. During museum opening hours, "Vessel Orchestra" plays a preprogrammed 20-minute piece composed by Beer for the exhibition. On Friday evenings, guest musicians and artists are invited to perform new compositions and improvisations on the installation in a series of in-gallery concerts.

 

"Oliver Beer: Vessel Orchestra" is on view at the Met Breuer until August 11. For additional information, see the museum's website.

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